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Africa Mental Health Reforms Campaign Webinar

To register for the webinar Click here and follow the link 

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MENTAL HEALTH OF ENTREPRENEURS

MENTAL HEALTH OF ENTREPRENEURS by Mariwala Health Initiative

Click here to download

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Trust in the process

In every stage in life there is always a key value that keep you going. The the road might be rough but to achieve a greater height you need to trust the process and keep to it. you need to keep the following

Dedication: The willingness to give a lot of time and energy to something because it is important. Always shown great dedication to the cause.

Sacrifice: When you sacrifice to make yourself and people around you happy, that can potentially increase trust and happiness. People who sacrifice for “approach-motivated” reasons—for long-term collective gain as an individual. To achieve a greater good you need to learn how to sacrifice your time and energy, an act of offering to a deity something precious especially, the killing of a victim on an altar

Time management: Time management is the process of planning and controlling how much time to spend on specific activities. Good time management enables an individual to complete more in a shorter period of time, lowers stress, and leads to career success.

Patience: Patience puts us in direct control of ourselves. And there is no more powerful an aid to success then self-possession. The reality therefore is that personal growth, like most processes in the physical natural world, requires enormous patience. To paraphrase billionaire investor, Warren Buffet, “you can’t produce a baby in one month by getting nine women pregnant.,” The same is true for personal growth.

Persistence and Self-improvement: The concept of self-growth for personal development and growth, whether achieved as formal or informal processes at an individual level or throughout an institution’s culture, forms the basic foundation of one’s way of being. Since each individual is different with divergent life goals, the concept of self-growth can be liberating yet challenging.

To keep move up in life and get that progress. You need to dedicate yourself to the process commit your mind and thoughts to it, discipline and believe in yourself. Manage your time well, be patient and persistent in your effort. Focus on self-improvement and before you know it you will be climbing up the ladder faster than you envisaged. When building a legacy, don’t give up on yourself and trust in the process.

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Advocacy

The emergence of mental health advocacy movements in several countries has helped to change society’s perceptions of persons with mental disorders. Individuals have begun to articulate their own visions of the services they need. They are increasingly able to make informed decisions about treatment and other matters in their daily lives. Individual and family participation in advocacy organizations may also have several positive outcomes.

Roles of different groups in advocacy

Individuals and families

Opinions vary among Individuals and their organizations about how best to achieve their goals. Some groups want active cooperation and collaboration with general health and mental health services, here as others desire complete separation from them. Individuals groups can play various roles in advocacy, ranging from influencing policies and legislation to providing help for people with mental disorders. Individuals have sensitized the general public about their cause and provided education and support to people with mental disorders. They have denounced some forms of treatment that are believed to be negative. They have denounced poor service delivery, inaccessible care and involuntary treatment. Individuals can also struggle for improved legal rights and the protection of existing rights. Programs run by Individuals concern drop-in centers, case management, crisis services and outreach. The roles of families in advocacy overlap with many of the areas taken on by Individuals. However, families have the distinctive role of caring for persons with mental disorders. In many places they are the primary care providers and their organizations are fundamental as support networks. In addition to providing mutual support and services, many family groups have become advocates, educating the community, increasing the support obtained from policy-makers, denouncing stigma and discrimination, and fighting for improved services.

Nongovernmental organizations

These organizations may be professional, involving only mental health professionals, or interdisciplinary, involving people from diverse areas. In some nongovernmental organizations, mental health professionals work with persons who have mental disorders, their families and other concerned individuals. Nongovernmental organizations fulfill many of the advocacy roles described for Individuals and families. Their distinctive contribution to the advocacy movement is that they support and empower Individuals and families with trainings and tools to push for better mental health care

General health workers and mental health workers

In places where care has been shifted from psychiatric hospitals to community services, mental health workers have taken a more active role in protecting Individuals rights and raising awareness for improved services. In traditional general health and mental health facilities it is not unusual that workers feel empathy for persons with mental disorders and become advocates for them over some issues. Some specific advocacy roles for mental health workers relate to:

  • clinical work from a Individuals and family perspective;
  • participation in the activities of Individuals and family groups;
  • supporting the development of Individuals groups and family groups;
  • planning and evaluating programs together.

Policy-makers and planners

Ministries of health and specifically their mental health sections, can play an important role in advocacy. Ministries of health may implement advocacy actions directly so as to influence the mental health of populations in general or consumers’ civil and health rights in particular. They may achieve similar or complementary impacts on these populations by working indirectly through supporting advocacy groups (consumers, families, nongovernmental organizations, mental health workers). Additionally, it is necessary for each ministry of health to convince other policy-makers and planners, e.g. the executive branch of government, the ministry of finance and other ministries, the judiciary, the legislature and political parties, to focus on and invest in mental health.

How ministries of health can support advocacy

By supporting advocacy activities with Individuals groups, family groups and non-governmental organizations Governments can provide these organizations with the support required for their development and empowerment. This support should not be accompanied by conditions that would prevent occasional criticism of the government. The empowerment of Individuals and families mean that they are given power, authority and a sense of capacity and ability. Principal steps for supporting Individuals groups, family groups and nongovernmental Organizations

The implementation of some of the ideas presented in this module could help ministries of health to support advocacy in their countries or regions. The development of an advocacy movement could facilitate the implementation of mental health policy and legislation and populations could receive many benefits. The needs of persons with mental disorders could be better understood and their rights could be better protected. They could receive services of improved quality and could participate actively in their planning, development, monitoring and evaluation. Families could be supported in their role as cares, and populations at large could gain an improved understanding of mental health and disorders

Our Strategy

The mandate health empowerment initiative overtime has developed and implement strategies to ensure the government take the Metal health bill with high priority. Some of our strategy include

CSOs and NGOs Round table discussion: to ensure every CSOs and NGOs that are in one way or the other related or interested in the mental health understand the main concept of the mental health bill and also understand the need to push for this bill and other mental health reform, we at Mandate health organized an Monthly meeting with all the interested individuals to discuss the Mental health bill.

Meeting with key Legislators: as part of our mandate to see that the mental health of individual is seen as priority and some key law are put in place, we usually have courtesy visits to some of the key resistor is the Health sector and in the environment sector or legislator who talk the mental health of her people. The focus of our discussion is always targeted on how we can see to the betterment of the people

Social Media Engagement: Another of our key area in letting our voice heard is using social media. We engage on weekly tweet chat where we educate people on mental health, educate people on mental health policy and also use the opportunity to reach out to the government.

We at Mandate health empowerment initiative, our goal is to build a mentally healthy sociality

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MHEI Volunteers

NAMEPHONE NOSTATEAREA OF INTEREST
Ohunene James AbujaMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Doris   Izuwah AbujaResearch and Publications; Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Joy Kemakolam0803xxxxxx3AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements; Capacity Building and Training; Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities; Community Outreach and Engagement
Asmau Ahmed  Abubakar AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements; Capacity Building and Training; Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Osewa    Pelumi AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements; Research and Abuja Publications; Capacity Building and Training; Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities; Community Outreach and Engagement
Chinelo   Enughobi AbujaCapacity Building and Training; Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities; Community Outreach and Engagement
John Odomene AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Community Outreach and Engagement  
Opeyemi     Osoare AbujaCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Olayemi    Olumurewa Joel AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Community Outreach and Engagement
Titus  Augustine Omaojo081xxxxxxx7AbujaMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Bridget  Oshiogbele0806xxxxxxx9AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Nneka    Osuji  Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Gabriel   Elaigwu AbujaCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Ibrahim   Sodiq AbujaCapacity Building and Training
Gospel   Ndunaka0706xxxxxxx8AbujaResearch and Publications;Media and Content writing
Sarah Abel AbujaMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Aliyu   Haruna Lagi AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Suleiman  Mohammed AbujaCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Olaseni  Mumin0806xxxxxxx3AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Capacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement
Ishaku Abdulmumini0706xxxxxxx0  AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Community Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Aicha   Dabo AbujaCapacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement
Obinna   Okoye0818xxxxxxx9AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Community Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Patience Agbaraji0706xxxxxx1AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support
Benjamin   Ibhazukor0806xxxxx1AbujaCapacity Building and Training, Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities, Community Outreach and Engagement, Consultancy, Psychosocial support
Hannatu Pamela Ishaya AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements, Research and Publications, Capacity Building and Training, Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities, Community Outreach and Engagement, Psychosocial support, Media and Content writing
Stephanie Williams0813xxxxxx0AbujaCapacity Building and Training, Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities, Community Outreach and Engagement
Foluke Odidi0806xxxxxx1AbujaMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities, Community Outreach and Engagement
Hadiza Abdullahi0803xxxxxx5AbujaResearch and Publications, Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Esther  Bassey Akwa IbomMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Ngozi   Azodo0809xxxxxx0Akwa IbomMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Consultancy;Psychosocial support;Media and Content writing
Nyaknobong  Inyang0706xxxxxx3Akwa IbomCapacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Consultancy;Media and Content writing
Ima-obong  Harrison0806xxxxx2Akwa IbomPsychosocial support
Immanuel  Adebayo090xxxxxxx6BayelsaChildren / Youth Mental Health;Drug Use / Substance Abuse;Mental Health First-Aid;Psychiatrist;Mental Health Education / Skills Development / Training  
Ogenyi Isaac  0706xxxxxx7BornoSocial Care and Services / Psychosocial Support;Children / Youth Mental Health;Mental Health First-Aid;Clinical Psychologist / Counselor;Mental Health Education / Skills Development / Training  
Balqees Momodu   EdoAdvocacy / Lobbying / Campaigning / Communications;Gender Equality / Women Rights;Children / Youth Mental Health;Drug Use / Substance Abuse;Mental Health First-Aid  
Fayemi    Taiwo090xxxxxxx6EkitiCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Ifeoluwa   Aremu0817xxxxxx7EkitiMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Chidiebere Frances Ozuligbo081xxxxxx0EnuguMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Capacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement
Nnenna Onyenucheya EnuguMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Augustine  Obialor     ImoResearch and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement  
Babannan Iliya JigawaCommunity Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Yakubu Bashir081xxxxxxx9JigawaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements, Capacity Building and Training, Community Outreach and Engagement
Umar Isah081xxxxxxxx2KadunaCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Jireh Moses08xxxxxxx4KadunaCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Sadiq Fada0803xxxxxx6KadunaCapacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support
Zainab Salaudeen090xxxxxx1KadunaResearch and Publications;Community Outreach and Engagement
Fareedah Ishaq080xxxxxx6KadunaMedia and Content writing
Lisa  Zazzau0813xxxxx4KadunaResearch and Publications
Katyit  Damang081xxxxxx6KadunaCapacity Building and Training, Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Victor Bayei080xxxxxx9KadunaCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Abdullahi  Lawal0803xxxxxx7KanoMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Capacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement
Monday Mathew KanoCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Hussein Raji080xxxxxxx7KwaraResearch and Publications
Bello Mariam0814xxxxxx8KwaraMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Adejoke Temitope  Hamzat081xxxxxx0KwaraMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Adeyemi Ariyo070xxxxxxx6KwaraCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Hassan Hassan090xxxxx8KwaraMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Rume  dave-uwode LagosMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Psychosocial support
Morakinyo Gbolahan LagosResearch and Publications;Media and Content writing
Omotayo Lawal090xxxxxxx9LagosPsychosocial support;Media and Content writing
Adetutu Taiwo0816xxxxxx3LagosCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Ukamaka Kodumuo LagosMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Community Outreach and Engagement
Oluwapelumi Ibitoye LagosMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Media and Content writing
Ibidun Faridat Olamide081xxxxxxx6LagosMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities, Community Outreach and Engagement, Psychosocial support, Media and Content writing
Modupeola Fagbenro080xxxxxxx0LagosMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements, Capacity Building and Training, Consultancy
Collins Okolo090xxxxxxx9LagosResearch and Publications, Media and Content writing
Oluwaseun   Adekanye080xxxxxxx0LagosResearch and Publications, Community Outreach and Engagement, Consultancy, Psychosocial support
Zaharaddeen  Aliyu0806xxxxxxx6NassarawaCapacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Esther Audu NassarawaCapacity Building and Training, Consultancy, Psychosocial support
Michael  Iyowu0703xxxxxx3  NigerMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications
Williams  Ochife NigerMedia and Content writing
Clementina Idinoba  080xxxxxx5NigerMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements, Capacity Building and Training, Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities, Community Outreach and Engagement, Psychosocial support
Rofiat Atanda OgunCommunity Outreach and Engagement  
Isreal Donatus OgunMedia and Content writing  
Temitope Adeola0703xxxxxx1OndoMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Olaseni Ibrahim081xxxxxxx8OndoMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities, Community Outreach and Engagement, Media and Content writing
Oyetunji Opeyemi081xxxxxx1OsunResearch and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Dare  Ogunsemi081xxxxxxx7OsunMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements, Research and Publications, Capacity Building and Training, Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities, Consultancy, Psychosocial support
Ibidun Faridat081xxxxx6OsunMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements, Research and Publications, Community Outreach and Engagement, Media and Content writing
Muhammed  Haroun0807xxxxx4OyoCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Olanrewaju Daniel OyoCommunity Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Oghenewoke Atariata081xxxxxx1OyoResearch and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support;Media and Content writing
Adebayo Aare090xxxxxx9OyoMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Media and Content writing
Fidelis Adire   RiversMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Community Outreach and Engagement  
Miracle Chinyere Anayo090xxxxx4NigerCommunity Outreach and Engagement  
Faith  Sambo0802xxxxx2AbujaResearch and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement;Consultancy;Psychosocial support;Media and Content writing
Bridget  Oshiogele0806xxxxx9AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Margaret  Ogbedaigo0909xxxxx7 FCT-AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support
Mallo Timothy070xxxxxx5 ABUJAResearch and Publications;Community Outreach and Engagement
Victoria Oyedele081xxxxxx3OgunMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
kucheli Hope Kobiba070xxxxxx5 JalingoPsychosocial support;Media and Content writing
Oluyemisi yetunde080xxxxx9Enugu stateMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements
Ogunbiyi Adeolu08xxxxx9 AbujaMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Fom Augustine08xxxxxx8Taraba State  Jalingo.Psychosocial support
Ooloje Fidelis Iduh09xxxxx55 Abuja-FCTMedia and Content writing
Terah  Micah Barde070xxxxxx5TarabaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support
Solomon Adeyemi070xxxxx4OsunAdvocacy / Lobbying / Campaigning / Communications;Human Rights / Social Justice;Children / Youth Mental Health;Fundraising / Civil Society Resources;Media and Communication (Including online and Community)
Tobiloba  ibraheem081xxxxxx7OsunHuman Rights / Social Justice;Children / Youth Mental Health
Oyewale Oyedun070xxxxxx2AbujaSocial Care and Services / Psychosocial Support;Children / Youth Mental Health;Drug Use / Substance Abuse;Mental Health First-Aid;Clinical Psychologist / Counselor;Mental Health Education / Skills Development / Training
FRANCIS Anichede0706xxxxx4PlateauMental Health First-Aid;Clinical Psychologist / Counselor;Mental Health Education / Skills Development / Training
Inyanda Joy Ugbojo0703xxxxx6AbujaGender Equality / Women’s Rights;Human Rights / Social Justice;Social Care and Services / Psychosocial Support;Children / Youth Mental Health;Drug Use / Substance Abuse;Mental Health First-Aid
HIKMATU   ABDULAI241xxxxx3GhanaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Omotayo   Johnson080xxxxx5Ogun stateResearch and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement
Obonganyanga Joshua081xxxxx8 Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Deborah  Ogunkolati081xxxx81LagosMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Abubakar Alhassan Garba0806xxxxx5Kano StateMedia and Content writing
ABUBAKAR SHUAIBU Abubakar081xxxxx6 Mental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements
Egwuatu  Chioma joy0703xxxxx4AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Community Outreach and Engagement
Aliyu   Ahmad Rufai081xxxxx4KanoMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Abba Musa070xxxxxx8KanoCapacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Friday Eguavoen080xxxx6AbujaCapacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support
Lekmak Tyoden070xxxxx8 Plateau StateCapacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support
Moses  Idowu081xxxxx7 Niger State.Mental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements
Ibukun Adeniyi090xxxxx14 Niger stateMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements
Ibidapo Kehinde Victoria081xxxxx20Niger StateMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements
Jennifer  Ayakpam070xxxx40AbujaCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Blessing  Azubuike081xxxx5Oyo stateMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Consultancy
Doosuur Chen234xxxxx631GombePsychosocial support
Timothy Abiodun Adeleye080xxxxx18 Gombe StateMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Psychosocial support
Temiloluwa  Okunade070xxxx19OyoMedia and Content writing
Ojibara Husseinat070xxxx66Kwara StateMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Ojibara Hassanat Taiye0810xxxx59Kwara StateMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements
Ojibara Rahmatallahi Taiye0703xxxx66 kwara stateMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
GRACE MAIYAKI090xxxxx7NigerCapacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Mercy B08xxxxx3Niger stateMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Sholola Oloruntobi0902xxxx7Niger StateCapacity Building and Training
Akuoma Vina080xxxxxx4FCT. AbujaMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support
Florence  Adepoju070xxxxxx4 Osun-StateMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Community Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Morakinyo Gbolahan08xxxxx72LagosMedia and Content writing
Fatokun Matthew Babafemi090xxxxx28Osun StateConsultancy
Chris Okafor070xxxxx4AbujaCommunity Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Olorunfemi Ogundipe081xxxxx27Ondo StateMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Consultancy;Psychosocial support;Media and Content writing
Jemimah Olaleye0816xxxxx82elite road, idi- abaResearch and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support;Media and Content writing
Samuel Michael Udeh0703xxxxx5 KadunaResearch and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement;Consultancy
Hussaini Kwaifa08xxxx40 AbujaCapacity Building and Training;Media and Content writing
Sarah Abel090xxxx100AbujaCapacity Building and Training
Violet Nwaiwu070xxxxx06 Abuja 
Kareem Muritala Bolaji07xxxxx61kwara state 
Paul Racheal08xxxxxx3Osun stateMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Media and Content writing
Florence Adepoju070xxxxx34osun StateMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Community Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Morakinyo Gbolahan080xxxxx72LagosMedia and Content writing
Fatokun Matthew Babafemi090xxxxx8Osun stateConsultancy
Chris Okafor07xxxxx64AbujaCommunity Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Olorunfemi ogundipe081xxxxx27Ondo  Mental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Consultancy;Psychosocial support;Media and Content writing
Jemimah Olaleye0816xxxxx82Elite road, Idi- AbaResearch and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support;Media and Content writing
Samuel Michael Udeh070xxxxxx15 kadunaResearch and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement;Consultancy
Hussaini Kwaifa080xxxxx40AbujaCapacity Building and Training;Media and Content writing
Sarah Abel0902xxxxx00AbujaCapacity Building and Training
Violet  Nwaiwu070xxxxxx06 AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Consultancy;Psychosocial support
Kareem  Muritala Bolaji07xxxxx61kwara stateResearch and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement;Consultancy
    
    
Sulaiman Oladele08xxxxx56 osun stateCapacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Consultancy
Ismaila Muhammed080xxxxxx9Kogi stateCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Ezechukwu Ekenechukwu081xxxxxx47RiversCommunity Outreach and Engagement
Stella okon08xxxxx42EnuguResearch and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities
Toluwanimi Oguntoye09xxxxxx1Ogun State.Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support
Sylvarlene  Njoku080xxxxx58AbujaResearch and Publications;Community Outreach and Engagement
Shammh Julius080xxxxxx22Abuja.Mental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements
Daniella Ofem081xxxxx64Abuja.Mental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Julianah  Agbona081xxxxx7OyoCapacity Building and Training;Community Outreach and Engagement
Ameh Daniel charls0806xxxxxx1AbujaMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
MUSTAPHA ADISA070xxxx86 AbujaCommunity Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support
Kemisola Fagbayi080xxxxxx8LagosMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Consultancy;Psychosocial support;Media and Content writing
Akinwunmi  Oluwaseun070xxxxx6AbujaResearch and Publications;Community Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Marcel Sunday080xxxxx563 AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement
Peace Orlu081xxxxx5AbujaMental Health Campaigns, Petitions and Statements;Research and Publications;Capacity Building and Training
David Richards0803xxxx3Ogun stateMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Psychosocial support
Adesokan Adediran081xxxxx9AbujaCommunity Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
Ime Eti-mfon080xxxxx0Akwa IbomMental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Media and Content writing
Tunji Shittu080xxxxxxx0 AbujaResearch and Publications;Capacity Building and Training;Mental Health Events and Networking Opportunities;Community Outreach and Engagement;Media and Content writing
    
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Public Perception of COVID-19 in Nigeria

Categories
Covid19 Uncategorized

Lesson 4: Psychological Impact of Quarantine on Relationships, Education etc

Lesson 3: Psychological Impact of Quarantine on Relationships, Education; The lecture applies to relationships.

(Mrs Sarah Chukukere)

All types of relationships including

  • Romantic
  • Friendship
  • Family
  • Etc

In the era of the Covid-19 virus, stringent methods like
quarantine and social distancing will make us redefine and recalibrate our
relationships. Mandatory quarantine which is being used across the globe to
control the spread of the virus has the potential of putting immense stress on
relationships as people end up being stuck in together in a sometimes-uncomfortable
situation with no options.

In this context, I am not just talking about romantic relationships,
but relationships that involve a shared living situation which includes but is
not limited to;

  • Married/unmarried couples living with or without
    children &/or siblings.
  • Friends or roommates living together.
  • Grown kids living with/or taking care of their
    aged parents

This new living situation may be why there has also been
increased reports of domestic violence around the world. One report from the UK
says that there has been a 30% increase in reports on domestic violence. Though
we were built to be social and live with each other, we were not programmed to
be next to each other every waking moment of the day. Consequently, there are
several psychological effects that quarantine could have on an individual.

In fact after this pandemic is over people will need a lot
of counselling for

  • post-traumatic stress symptoms
  • confusion
  • anger
  • avoidance behavior

So, what are the things that could put stress on
relationships?

  • longer quarantine duration
  • Financial loss or no finance
  • Loss of jobs
  • infection fears
  • frustration
  • boredom
  • inadequate supplies
  • inadequate information
  • and stigma.

To mention a few

  • If there are children in a house,
  • more things will be broken,
  • they may start misbehaving for attention
  • One person may get tired of doing all the house
    work and lash out

STRATEGIES FOR COPING 

Maintaining a good healthy relationship during this period
will take a lot of willpower, patience & positivity. However, here are some
not-so-obvious tips for coping.

The Rule of 4: For every 1 bad trait, think of 4 good ones:
We all have bad traits we may/or may not know about, however the quarantine may
become a magnifying glass on these traits. During this time, it is advised not
to dwell on the bad traits, instead think about 4 other good traits the person
has. Doing this as a regular mental exercise could help you maintain a good
relationship.

Nostalgia: Think about the good times and spend a few
minutes every day reminiscing about precious moments. Remind yourself of
memorable events in the past or why you fell in love or have a deep bond. This
can help you see how far you have come and, help you look forward towards a
brighter future.

Pinch of salt: Instead of striving for a better partner by
commenting on every single thing or mistakes , concentrate on avoiding or
overlooking elementary mistakes or “take it with a pinch of salt” as
they say. Know that you are also far from perfect and probably make your own
mistakes too.

Fight to control your own negative reactions, this period is
a great time for emotional learning to increase our emotional intelligence.
Negative reactions to situations on make them worse. If the affront is one you
can’t endure, then say something, but do it calmly without retaliating, because
the negativity effect can quickly turn a small disagreement into a raging
battle.

Take some time out to play couples games. Most couples don’t
realize how much they don’t know about each other rather, they usually assume
certain things. For example, a couples Q&A session could reveal that a boyfriend
actually does not prefer to sleep on the left side of the bed, but does so to
make it easier for his girlfriend to sleep next to the window because she gets
really hot at night.

Here is a fun game I like to give couples I counsel to play.

  • What’s your partner’s least favorite body part?
  • When your partner was a child, what did they
    want to be when they grew up?
  • Name a country your partner would love to visit.
  • Did your partner have a nickname as a child?
    What was it? Bonus point: Did they like the nickname? Why?
  • Which of your partner’s aunts or uncles
    are they closest to? [Skip if not applicable]
  • What disappointment or rejection from your
    partner’s past still stings?
  • Which of your partner’s achievements are
    they most proud of?
  • What is your partner’s least favorite housework
    task?
  • Name two of your partner’s
    grandparents. Bonus point: Can you name all their grandparents?
  • Outside of their career, what’s something
    your partner considers themselves naturally talented at?
  • What is your partner’s favorite smell?
  • What is your partner’s favorite flavor of
    ice cream?
  • What is a personality trait your
    partner dislikes about themselves, and that they share with a parent?
  • Of all the ways there are to die, which
    does your partner fear the most?
  • What type of music does your partner secretly
    like? What’s a musical taste they have that most people wouldn’t know they
    enjoy?
  • What does your partner typically look
    forward to most about the weekend?
  • Who is someone your partner considers to be a
    mentor, or who has been a strong positive influence on their professional
    development?
  • How did your partner spend their summers as a
    child?
  • What is your partner’s favorite and least
    favorite aspects of their work?
  • Does your partner consider themselves more like
    their mother or their father in terms of personality? In what way?
  • What purchase is your partner currently
    considering?
  • What’s on their wish list?
Categories
Covid19 Uncategorized

Lesson 3: Mental Health Psychosocial Support.

Lesson 3: Mental Health Psychosocial Support.

Mr Zion Ameh Abba

Introduction

Let’s understand that the composite term ‘Mental Health and Psychosocial Support’ (MHPSS) refers to any type of local or outside support that aims to protect or promote psychosocial well-being or prevent or treat mental disorders. Among humanitarian agencies the term is widely used and serves as a unifying concept that can be used by professionals in various sectors. MHPSS interventions can be implemented in programs for health & nutrition, protection (community-based protection, child protection and SGBV) or education. The term ‘MHPSS problems may cover a wide range of issues including social problems, emotional distress, common mental disorders (such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder), severe mental disorders (such as psychosis), alcohol and substance abuse, and intellectual or developmental disabilities.

Protection objectives we must keep at heart:

  1. To ensure that emergency responses are safe, dignified, participatory, community owned, and socially and culturally acceptable.
  2. To maintain the protection and well-being of persons of concern by strengthening community and family support.
  3. To ensure that persons distressed by mental health and psychosocial problems have access to appropriate care.
  4. To ensure that persons suffering from moderate or severe mental disorders have access to essential mental health services and to social care.
  5. MHPSS core principles to work with regardless of the sector you are deploying mental health and psychosocial support include;

Principle 1: Ensure human rights and equity Humanitarian actors should promote the human rights of all affected persons and protect individuals and groups who are at heightened risk of human rights violations and at the same time ensure participation.                                                                                                                                               

Principle 2: Do no harm Humanitarian aid is an important means of helping people affected by emergencies, but aid can also cause unintentional harm. Work on mental health and psychosocial support has the potential to cause harm because it deals with highly sensitive issues. In addition, it lacks an extensive evidence base that is available for some other disciplines. Humanitarian actors may reduce the risk of harm in various ways, such as: o Participating in coordination groups to learn from others and to minimize duplication and gaps in response o Designing interventions on the basis of valid information o Committing to evaluation, openness to scrutiny and external review o Developing cultural sensitivity and competence in the areas in which they intervene/work; o Staying updated on the evidence base regarding effective practices; and o Developing an understanding of, and consistently reflecting on, universal human rights, power relations between outsiders and emergency-affected people, and the value of participatory approaches. (Anderson, 1999).

Principle 3: Build on available resources and capacities All affected groups have assets or resources that support mental health and psychosocial well-being. A key principle – even in the early stages of an emergency – is building local capacities, supporting self-help and strengthening the resources already present.

Principle 4: Use Integrated support systems Activities and programming should be integrated as far as possible. The proliferation of stand-alone services, such as those dealing only with rape survivors or only with people with a specific diagnosis, such as PTSD, can create a highly fragmented care system.

Principle 5: Provide multilayered support in emergencies, people are affected in different ways and require different kinds of supports. A key to organizing mental health and psychosocial support is to develop a layered system of complementary supports that meets the needs of different groups. All layers are important and should ideally be implemented concurrently, such as in the IASC pyramid: o Basic services and security.

Principle 6: Anticipation, planning, preparation and advice the services, including the psychosocial and mental health services that are required following disasters and major incidents, are much more likely to work effectively if the need for them has been anticipated and defined. This requires understanding of the dynamic shifts that occur with the passage of time and of the clarity about how these services are to collaborate with other services that offer humanitarian aid and responses to people’s welfare and psychosocial needs after disasters and major incidents. Knowledge about how people may react psychosocially to disasters and major incidents is likely to assist responsible people in making effective decisions prior to events and when they are making decisions while under strain during events.

Principle 7: Needs-oriented planning for families and communities All aspects of psychosocial and mental health care should only be provided with full consideration of people’s wider social environments, the cultures within which they live, and, particularly, their families and the communities in which they live, work and move. The service responses provided from within societies and, in the case of disasters and major incidents that cause greater devastation, the actions taken by external countries and organizations should be proportionate to the needs of the people who have been affected. This requires a strategic stepped model of care to underpin a variety of levels of planning and preparation before events and the multi-layered support that is provided afterwards.

Principle 8: Developing, sustaining and restoring psychosocial resilience This principle means that actions taken, including those that determine how services respond to the needs of communities and people regarding their psychosocial and mental health care, should actively maximize participation of local, affected populations whatever the degree of devastation in each area. Restoring, first, the functioning, and second, the social fabric of communities is extremely important in how societies, communities and services respond effectively to the psychosocial and mental health effects of disasters and major incidents. If communities are to receive comprehensive responses to their psychosocial and mental health needs after disasters and major incidents, the following types of service are required: (a) humanitarian aid; (b) welfare services; (c) services that are able to assist people and communities to develop and sustain their resilience; and (d) timely and responsive mental health services.

Principle 9: Integrating psychosocial and mental healthcare responses into policy and into humanitarian aid, welfare, social care and health care agencies’ work Achieving comprehensive psychosocial care and mental health services for moderate and large-scale emergencies requires that lessons learned through research and experience are translated into integrated, ethical policy and plans at four levels. They are: o governance policies o strategic policies for service design o service delivery policies o policies for good clinical practice. Governance policies relate to how countries, regions and counties are governed. Governance policies require the responsible authorities to develop strategic policies. Strategy should be developed by bringing together evidence from research, past experience, knowledge of the nature of areas of the country for which they are responsible and of their populations, and the profile of risks, to design services. Policies for good clinical practice concern how clinical staff take account of the needs and preferences of patients, deploy their clinical skills, and work with patients to agree how guidelines, care pathways and protocols are interpreted in individual cases. Policy at each of the four levels should be informed by culture and values as well as by evidence and experience gleaned from practice.

Principle 10: All planners, incident commanders, practitioners, volunteers, researchers and evaluators should agree to work to a common set of standards In certain circumstances, especially those in which there is widespread devastation, high standards may not be achievable until there has been restoration of basic community functioning and resources, including clean water and food supplies, shelter and protection, communications, and healthcare. Situations of this kind should be anticipated and covered by planning. Planning should consider the minimum standards required in a range of different circumstances. The standards adopted have substantial implications for training, research, evaluation and information gathering because all of these capabilities should be core parts of all disaster and major incident response plans. This means that the requirement for them is anticipated and standards for research, evaluation and information-gathering should be developed and planned before disasters occur. Research and evaluation should identify the factors that contribute to either the success or failure of particular types of service, their organization and delivery, and particular interventions. Research and evaluation should include follow-up studies that are designed to identify long-term effects that may be associated with psychosocial intervention programs.

So, this are the core principles of MHPSS however, other aspect like the ethical, cultural aspect are key including the ongoing MHPSS response,

  • Immediate MHPSS response,
  • MHPSS actions before interventions begin,
  • MHPSS recommendation for preparedness,
  • Social media preparedness phase etc.

Thanks for joining us

Check the attached documents for MHPSS intervention Pyramid, The MHPSS program including the myths and facts about MHPSS

Categories
Covid19 Uncategorized

Lesson 2: Core Mental Health Issues.

Lesson 2; Core Mental Health Issues.

Dr. Garba

Introduction

Mental health is recently enjoying increased public awareness especially due to cluster of events hitting the newsstands and the social media. Frequently reported suicides especially by use of sniper or jumping off the bridge on 3rd mainland bridge are still fresh in our memories. Similarly, the outcry over the use of psychoactive substances especially codeine became quite worrisome. Besides the above sensational scenarios, a lot mental health issues are quite common and very frequently missed.

The stigma associated with mental health problems is also worthy of consideration as it determines to a large extent whether persons will seek help promptly or not.

Overview

Mental health encompasses all areas of psychological well-being. It involves the maintenance of a stable emotion, social, psychological and mood states while facing daily living challenges. This entails an ability to cope with the challenges of life without breaking down. One is able to be happy when the need arises, show sadness appropriately as well as other emotional tones like anger, jealousy, excitement, disappointment at the appropriate times and for the appropriate duration of time.

It also important to note that mental well-being is incorporated by the WHO in the comprehensive definition of what constitutes HEALTH. So, there’s no good health without MENTAL HEALTH

Misconceptions about mental illness

Let’s briefly take a look at common Misconceptions about mental illness

A lot of misconceptions exist around mental health. Many believe that they are due to spiritual or demonic afflictions. Many also believe they are due to individual weaknesses or deficiencies in personality and character. Some others often think that they are a result of drug abuse only. However, the truth is far from any of the above beliefs.

Mainly, there are multiple factors that can lead to the development of mental health problems. These are currently summarized as biological, psychological and social factors or simply BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL causes. These factors are also to be considered in therapy for mental health illnesses.

Biological factors include those that are constitutional or due to biological influences

These biological factors may be inherited predispositions like have close relatives like parents or siblings have a mental health challenge which will also imply that one is having the genes. This does not however mean that everyone carrying the genetic predisposition will develop an illness as environmental factors also play important roles

Psychological factors include those factors like personality type, the kind of love and care persons experience while growing up, and psychological impact of other experiences. Example may be witnessing a horrifying event like ghastly road accidents, being the victim or witness of rape, torture or murder.

Social factors can include poverty, poor living conditions, being an immigrant or a refugee, or even the solitude from the current COVID 19 lockdown

Let’s take a look at common mental health issues of note next

Common mental health issues worthy of note include but are not limited to the ones listed below

  • Anxiety
  • Mood disorders
  • Psychotic disorders
  • Substance use disorders
  • Organic mental disorders
  • Eating disorders
  • Personality disorders

Anxiety disorders- these are by far the commonest group of mental health challenges that are encountered in general medical practice and are usually missed by practitioners. This is because many of the symptoms and vague and non-specific to any particular organ system of the body.

Mood disorders are characterized by changes in mood states of which the commonest is Depression. Actually, mood problems can encompass any condition from depression where the person experiences persistent low mood/feelings of sadness, low energy, and lack of interest in pleasurable activities on the one hand, and MANIA which is almost the exact opposite of depression as it is characterized by elation, excessive energy, feelings of grandiosity and beliefs and many more

There are many shades of mood problems in between the 2 described above.

Psychotic disorders include those in which persons experience distortion in thinking, perceptions, experiences, beliefs, and where hallucinations may be present. Here, the individuals are not in touch with reality and they are often said to have lost their EGO BOUNDARIES as they often cannot tell the difference between personal experience and what is perceived externally from the environment.

Substance use disorders are all the various mental health issues that can arise from the use of psychoactive substances. These can range from Drug misuse or harmful use to Dependence or Addiction as the case may be.

Organic mental disorders arise from mainly other health conditions but manifesting with mental disorder symptoms. These includes Seizure disorders (convulsions), degenerative brain diseases like Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia, head injuries and their sequelae, effects of uncontrolled diabetes, hypertension, kidney failure, liver failure, severe anemia and many others

Eating disorders anorexia and bulimia, pica and other abnormalities associated with eating

Personally disorders are generally a pattern of behavior and thinking that is often unusual and cause problems with how the person relates to himself and other members of the society

There are other disorders that are specific to children, or that are gender specific

Thank you all for your time

It was a nice time during this session, from the above explanation by Doc Garba it seems all of us a vulnerable to different types of mental challenges and that makes it imperative for proper self care so we dont slide into serious mental health challenges.

We can practice below these Ten Things  for Your Mental Health, Try these tips to keep your balance, or re-balance yourself.

1. Value yourself:

Treat yourself with kindness and respect, and avoid self-criticism. Make time for your hobbies and favorite projects, or broaden your horizons. Do a daily crossword puzzle, plant a garden, take dance lessons, learn to play an instrument or become fluent in another language.

2. Take care of your body:

  • Taking care of yourself physically can improve your mental health. Be sure to:
  • Eat nutritious meals
  • Avoid cigarettes
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Exercise, which helps decrease depression and anxiety and improve moods
  • Get enough sleep. Researchers believe that lack of sleep contributes to a high rate of depression in college students. 

3. Surround yourself with good people: People with strong family or social connections are generally healthier than those who lack a support network. Make plans with supportive family members and friends, or seek out activities where you can meet new people, such as a club, class or support group.

4. Give yourself: Volunteer your time and energy to help someone else. You’ll feel good about doing something tangible to help someone in need — and it’s a great way to meet new people.

5. Learn how to deal with stress: Like it or not, stress is a part of life. Practice good coping skills: Try One-Minute Stress Strategies, do Tai Chi, exercise, take a nature walk, play with your pet or try journal writing as a stress reducer. Also, remember to smile and see the humor in life. Research shows that laughter can boost your immune system, ease pain, relax your body and reduce stress.

6. Quiet your mind: Try meditating, Mindfulness and/or prayer. Relaxation exercises and prayer can improve your state of mind and outlook on life. In fact, research shows that meditation may help you feel calm and enhance the effects of therapy.

7. Set realistic goals: Decide what you want to achieve academically, professionally and personally, and write down the steps you need to realize your goals. Aim high, but be realistic and don’t over-schedule. You’ll enjoy a tremendous sense of accomplishment and self-worth as you progress toward your goal. 

8. Break up the monotony: Although our routines make us more efficient and enhance our feelings of security and safety, a little change of pace can perk up a tedious schedule. Alter your jogging route, plan a road-trip, take a walk in a different park, hang some new pictures or try a new restaurant.

9. Avoid alcohol and other drugs: Keep alcohol use to a minimum and avoid other drugs. Sometimes people use alcohol and other drugs to “self-medicate” but in reality, alcohol and other drugs only aggravate problems.

10. Get help when you need it: Seeking help is a sign of strength — not a weakness. And it is important to remember that treatment is effective. People who get appropriate care can recover from mental illness and addiction and lead full, rewarding lives.

But, I’ve just tried to scratch the surface of what is MENTAL HEALTH but I hope the questions arising will enable me shed more as required.

THANK YOU.

Categories
Covid19 Uncategorized

Lesson 1: MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT TRAINING

DAY 1: MENTAL HEALTH SUPPORT TRAINING; Introduction to Covid-19 and its impact on Mental Health

Welcome to today’s training, How to offer Mental Health Psychosocial Support in the face of COVID-19 and stay without depression. Trainer: Mr. Ogoenyi Isaac Agbo, a Clinical Psychologist.

In any epidemic, it is common for individuals to feel stressed and worried.

Common responses of people affected (both directly and indirectly) might include:

  • Fear of falling ill and dying.
  • Avoiding approaching health facilities due to fear of becoming infected while in care.
  • Fear of losing livelihoods, not being able to work during isolation, and of being dismissed from work.
  • Fear of being socially excluded/placed in quarantine because of being associated with the disease (e.g. stimatization against persons who are from, or perceived to be from, affected areas)
  • Feeling powerless in protecting loved ones and fear of losing loved ones because of the virus
  • Fear of being separated from loved ones and caregivers due to quarantine regime.
  • Refusal to care for unaccompanied or separated minors, people with disabilities or the elderly due to fear of infection, because parents or caregivers have been taken into quarantine.
  • Feelings of helplessness, boredom, loneliness and depression due to being isolated
  • Fear of reliving the experience of a previous epidemic.

Emergencies are always stressful, but specific stressors particular to COVID-19 outbreak affect the population. Stressors include:

  • Risk of being infected and infecting others, especially if the transmission mode of COVID-19 is not 100% clear
  • Common symptoms of other health problems (e.g. a fever) can be mistaken for COVID-19 and lead to fear of being infected.
  • Caregivers may feel increasingly worried for their children being at home alone (due to school closures) without appropriate care and support.
  • Risk deterioration of physical and mental health of vulnerable individuals, for example older adults (Intervention 1) and people with disabilities (Intervention 2), if caregivers are placed in quarantine if other care and support is not in place. Furthermore, frontline workers (including nurses, doctors, ambulance drivers, case identifiers, and others) may experience additional stressors during the COVID-19 outbreak:

Stigmatization towards those working with COVID-19 patients and their remains Strict bio-security measures:

– Physical strain of protective equipment

– Physical isolation making it difficult to provide comfort to someone who is sick or in distress

– Constant awareness and vigilance

– Strict procedures to follow preventing spontaneity and autonomy

– Higher demands in the work setting, including long work hours, increased patient numbers and keeping up-to-date with best practices as information about COVID-19 develops

– Reduced capacity to use social support due to intense work schedules and stigma within the community towards frontline workers

– Insufficient personal or energy capacity to implement basic self-care. Insufficient information about the long-term exposure to individuals infected by COVID-19

– Fear that frontline workers will pass COVID-19 onto their friends and family as a result of their work. The constant fear, worry and stressors in the population during the COVID-19 outbreak can lead to long-term consequences within communities and families:

– Deterioration of social networks, local dynamics and economies

– Stigma towards surviving patients resulting in rejection by communities

– Possible anger and aggression against government and frontline workers.

– Possible mistrust of information provided by government and other authorities.

– People with developing or existing mental health and substance use disorders experiencing relapses and other negative outcomes because they are avoiding health facilities or unable to access their care providers. Some of these fears and reactions spring from realistic dangers, but many reactions and behaviors are also borne out of lack of knowledge, rumors and misinformation.

Common rumors regarding COVID-19 include:

  • The virus only attacks old people and spares young people and children.
  • The virus can be transmitted through pets and people should abandon their pets.
  • The use of mouthwash, antibiotics, cigarettes, and liquor with high alcohol can kill COVID-19.
  • The disease is premeditated and COVID-19 is a bioweapon designed to target a specific population.
  • Food items are contaminated and will spread the virus.
  • Only members of specific cultural or ethnic groups can spread the virus.

Social stigma and discrimination can be associated with COVID-19, including towards persons who have been infected, their family members and health care and other frontline workers. Steps must be taken to address stigma and discrimination at all phases of the COVID-19 emergency response. Care should be taken to promote the integration of people who have been affected by COVID-19 without over-targeting. On a more positive note, some people may have positive experiences, such as pride about finding ways of coping and resilience. Faced with disaster, community members often show great altruism and cooperation, and people may experience great satisfaction from helping others.

 Examples of MHPSS community activities during a COVID-19 outbreak might include:

  • Maintaining social contact with people who might be isolated using phone calls or text messages.
  • Sharing key factual messages within the community, especially with individuals who don’t use social media.
  • Providing care and support to people who have been separated from their families and caregiver. Some of these fears and reactions spring from realistic dangers, but many reactions and behaviors are also borne out of lack of knowledge, rumors and misinformation.

 ACTIVITIES THAT WILL SUPPORT ADULTS’ WELLBEING DURING HOME ISOLATION/QUARANTINE

  • Physical exercise (e.g. yoga, tai chi, stretching)
  • Cognitive exercises
  • Relaxation exercises (e.g. breathing, meditation, mindfulness)
  • Reading books and magazines.
  • Reduce the time spent looking at fearful images on TV.
  • Reduce time listening to rumours.
  • Search information from reliable sources.
  • Reduce time looking for information (1-2 times per day, rather than every hour).

The messages below focus on promoting mental health and wellbeing in communities affected by COVID-19. MESSAGES FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC FOR DEALING WITH STRESS DURING THE COVID-19 OUTBREAK:

  • It is normal to feel sad, distressed, worried, confused, scared or angry during a crisis.
  • Talk to people you trust. Contact your friends and family.
  • If you must stay at home, maintain a healthy lifestyle (including a proper diet, sleep, exercise and social contact with loved ones at home). Keep in touch with family and friends through email, phone calls and making use of social media platforms.
  • Don’t use tobacco, alcohol or other drugs to cope with your emotions.
  • If you feel overwhelmed, talk to a health worker, social worker, similar professional, or another trusted person in your community (e.g., religious leader or community elder).
  • Have a plan where to go and seek help for physical and mental health and psychosocial needs, if required.
  • Get the facts about your risk and how to take precautions. Use credible sources to get information, such as WHO website or, a local or NCDC.
  • Decrease the time you and your family spend watching or listening to upsetting media coverage.
  • Draw on skills that you have used in the past during difficult times to manage your emotions during this outbreak.
  • Be optimistic and hopeful.
  • Spiritual connection to feel supernaturally protected.